CSG Winter 2018 – Research and Teaching & Learning IT: Partnering with the Library

This morning’s workshop on partnering between IT and Libraries features Jenn Stringer/Chris Hoffman (Berkeley), Jennifer Sparrow/Joe Salem (Penn State), Diane Butler (Rice), Cliff Lynch (CNI), Louis King (Yale), David Millman (NYU)

The morning is starting off with some thoughts from Cliff Lynch (CNI):

Reminders of some things many haven’t lived through: In the early 90s there was a call not only for collaboration between IT and Libraries, but serious talk of merging. It was tried at a few institutions, like Columbia University. The takeaway was that it’s fairly crazy at large institutions. The mission expansion of each has been in differing rather than overlapping areas. But it’s been successful at a number of liberal arts organizations.

When CNI was founded it was totally viewed as a collaboration between the CIO and the head of the Library at member institutions. In the early 2000s that makeup was changing. The representation was the head of the library and someone doing research or academic computing, or doing digital work in the libraries. Led to increasing disengagement of the CIOs. Starting around 2000 started putting on executive roundtables with the intent of re-engaging the CIOs. It was fairly easy in the first few years to come up with topics in that sweet spot, but it got harder. If you look back from 1990 – 2005 you see that Libraries had low levels of technical expertise. At the same time libraries had developed some internal expertise in technologies important for digital humanities, data curation, etc, where there is now more competence than in the central IT org, which has structured its mission around infrastructure, compliance, etc. Libraries continue to rely on IT for fundamental infrastructure.

If you look at the landscape, how much IT capability is native to the library, and how much replicates or compliments the expertise in IT. This is hugely inconsistent. If you polled the CSG campuses you’d be surprised at the degree of variation in organic IT expertise in the library.

Collaborations involving library have become much more multilateral rather than bilateral with IT – involving partners like University Presses, Museums, research data management, digital scholarship centers (often involving academic school or department), geospatial centers, maker spaces. \

Don’t forget collaboration on institutional policies. Data governance, privacy and reuse of student data and analytics, responsibility of university to preserving scholarly products. Had a recent roundtable looking at policy implications of adoption of widespread cloud platforms.

This area does not lend itself to checklists.

UC Berkeley – Chris Hoffman

A history of good intentions – Museum Informatics Project – Housed in Library, Digital collections and DAMS. Complicating factors: Sustainability, budget cuts, grant funding; priorities; loss of key champions; culture.

Collectionspace – managing collections for museums.

Research Data Management – an impetus for change. New drivers (DMP requirements), new change leaders, new models for partnership. Benchmarking justified need. Broad definition of research data – all digital parts of a research project. Priority to nurture collaboration between IT and Library. Co-funded a position for program manager. Campus-wide perspective, investing in understanding and bridging cultures.

What’s next? More challenging tests to partnerships, RDM 2.0, Visualization and makerspaces, more fundamental technologies? (archival storage, virtual teaching and research environments); strategic alignment?

NYU – Stratos Efstathiadis, David Millman, David Ackerman

Research technology works closely with LIbraries.

Data Services – estab. 2008. 11 FTE Consultation and instructional support for scholars using quantitative, qualitative, survey design, and geospatial software and methods. Joint service of IT and Libraries.

Digital Library Technology Services – estab ca. 2000. Digital content publication and preservation. New services to support current scholarly communication. R&D to develop new services and partnerships, 19 FTE.

Research Data Management Services – estab 2015. 2 FTE. Promulgate beset practices in data organization, curation, description, publication, compliance, preservation planning, and sharing.

Research Cloud Services – new collaboration build on other preexisting services. Inteconnected research storage environment. REimagine a spectrum of cloud storage from dynamic to published final products. Provide backbone for researchers but also Libraries collections and workflows.

Yale – Louis King

Considerable history at Yale in working in digital transformation space.

Office of Digital Assets and Infrastructure – Sept 2008. Work closely with Library and ITS. Focus on Digital Assets & Infrastructure. Take advantage of disciplinary approach of libraries and technical capacity of IT.

Looking for ways to gain efficiencies and lower overhead for people who want to manage digital content.

Had some substantial initial success, but changes: Initial provost sponsor left Yale, 2009 financial crash, VP retired, two library director transitions, transition in IT director, emerging digital systems in Library.

Late 2012 relaunch as Yale Digital Collections Center, but closed in 2015. But it catalyzed momentum towards digital transformation at Yale. Established the foundation for many successful current and future collaborations.

Rice University – Diane Butler

Library and IT have been partners for a long time. For a very short time, the organizations were merged. Research IT and library have been partners since 2012 and informally even further back. Began iwth library providing the service and IT providing the core infrastructure but has morphed into a collaborative partnership.

Areas of collaboration: Data Management (through Library). Provide consultation, including creating DMP, describing and organizing data, storing data, and sharing data. Training, Access to resources such as platform for sharing and preserving publications and small-to-medium datasets. Still an area for work as faculty aren’t very engaged.

Digital Scholarship: Service provided by library with IT providing infrastructure. Preserving scholarship, navigating copyright and open access, managing and visualizing data, digitizing materials, consultation, etc.  Research IT has history in supporting engineering and sciences, but not so much in humanities.

Digital Humanities: Imagine Rio Project. Most successful collaborative project to date. An architecture and history professors joining together to imagine Rio de Janeiro. Searchable atlas of social and urban evolution of Rio.

Positive outcomes: Research IT had not supported Humanities or qualitative social sciences previously. Success of project has brought in more funding. Research IT now has 2 facilitators that are working with faculty in those disciplines.

At Rice the board has come up with some base funding for research computing, so that all of the work doesn’t have to be funded by grants.

Penn State – Joe Salem and Jennifer Sparrow

Strong history of working with libraries, IT, and student services on accessibility issues. Thinking about spaces in place and how to leverage institutional spaces. Built a “blue box” classroom.

Worked on the Dreamery – a co-learning space for bringing emerging technologies onto campus.

Driving strategic initiatives: Collaborative, technology-infused space. Inherited a space called the Knowledge Commons. Includes a corner with staffing from both Libraries and Academic Tech. Service partnership profile has grown from just a focus on media, to overall platform for supporting students. Work on curricular support together – open educational resources and portable content. Instructional design is a focus.

Learning Spaces committee – Provide leadership in innovative instruction.

What makes the partnership work … or not? What does each side bring to the table?

Chris – Berkeley

Visualization service at Berkeley. HearstCAVE: Connected virtual spaces over the Pacific Research Platform around preserving archaeology preservation. Thinking about how it connects with data science.

Markerspaces at UCB – pockets of excellence and experimentation. Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation. Talking with library and ETS to look at space.

Hooking the two together in a Center for Connected Learning.

Research Data Management at Yale
Much Ado about Something: Complex funder requirements; reliable verficiation of results; reuse of data in new research.

What are the responsibilities and rights of the University and faculty regarding research data? They put out a Yale Research Data & Materials Policy. Developed over 2-2 years with collaboration across the university. There is significant collaboration in support of that policy – Library and IT collaboration: Research Data Strategic Initiaitive Group, Research Data Consultation Group, Yale Center for Research Computing.

Recommendation: Research Data Service Unit; REports within LIbrary – Assessment, coordination, outreach and communication. Federated support model for all research data support services – research technology, data management, metadata, outreach & communications, customer relations, education and training, research data administrative analytics.

NYU – David Millman

Bottom-up requirements – survey local researchers: IT/Lib complementary styles, contacts. Survey peers: IT’Lib coordinated.

Executive review: Dean, AVP-level

NYU – research repository service identification. Umbrella of services – – researc lifecycle. Creation, manipulation, publication, etc. Holistic — customer focus. 1. HPC storage. 2 – medium” performance storage (CIFS, NFS); 3 – “published” sotrage – preserved, curated, citable.

IT/Library crossover strategy questions: business of universities: long-term preservation of scholarship. Any updates on our participation in digital preservation facilities? Some of our colleagues have recommended highly distributed protocols for better preservation. How do we approach this?

 

 

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