Dev Days – Scott Hanselman on ASP.net MVC

Scott Hanselman – ASP.NET MVC

Visual Studio 2010 Beta 2

ASP.NET MVC does not dictate which database is used for Models, so new projects open with an empty Models folder.

URL structure is a user interface. ASP.NET MVC sets up predictable urls by default – a structured convention.

MVC built on top of web forms ASP.NET > MVC > Web Forms. MVC programmers can use all the existing stuff, but there’s like a new vehicle – webforms is like a minivan, but MVC is like a motorcycle – you could kill yourself, but you can go a lot faster.

Pluggable view engines.

Shows haml – which uses indentation and significant white space to make code cleaner.

Now shipping jquery in ASP.NET and MVC – MS contributing to the open source project.

By default C# code is compiled but views are not.

[ICPL 2008] Outsourcing E-Mail: Technology and Policy

Our panel on email went very well. I didn’t take complete notes, as I was on the panel, but here’s what I got: The panel started with John Calkins, Assistant General Counsel from Northwestern, where they’ve implemented Google for students. A good quote: “Free is just one point on a spectrum between they pay us … Continue reading “[ICPL 2008] Outsourcing E-Mail: Technology and Policy”

Our panel on email went very well. I didn’t take complete notes, as I was on the panel, but here’s what I got:

The panel started with John Calkins, Assistant General Counsel from Northwestern, where they’ve implemented Google for students. A good quote: “Free is just one point on a spectrum between they pay us to we pay them.”

For FERPA they’re thinking that student email residing in a student account is not a record maintained by the University, and therefore would not be covered by FERPA. They also got Google to agree that any record that would be subject to FERPA at the university would be treated as such by Google. They hear that Google is not necessarily willing to agree to that now.

By and large their view is that the arrangement is between Google and the individual student (or alum), not between the university and the student.

90% of their recent graduating class elected to keep their google account with advertising as alumni.

Asbed Bedrossian from USC, which has also implemented Google for students, talked next. Another good quote: “We in the IT department are the transmission fluid in making things run smoothly.”

They use Shibboleth for allowing people to sign in to Google applications on the web with their USC NetID and password. They give people a different password for use if they want to use a non-web IMAP client to access email. (I need to ask Asbed about what they use for Google Talk access with non-web clients).

66% of people who create accounts forward their USC email address to Google. His theory on the rest is that they just want to use the other collaboration apps.

They haven’t had a lot of support issues, but people did start calling their help desk during the recent Google outage.

They use ga.usc.edu for their third level domain name.

They’re not migrating mail from existing USC accounts to Google – that turned out to not be a big deal to students at all and they’ve only had a couple of requests for it.

Another good quote: “Doing things is easy – thinking is hard.”

My slides from my part of the panel are here.

Microsoft announces new online services

Microsoft today announced new packages bundled under the Microsoft Online Services name. Looks interesting. They’re talking about something called Exchange and Sharepoint “Online Deskless Worker” (targeted at people who only occasionally use a computer during the day) for $3 per month, whereas “information workers” are supposed to purchase the full suite, including Exchange, Sharepoint, Live … Continue reading “Microsoft announces new online services”

Microsoft today announced new packages bundled under the Microsoft Online Services name. Looks interesting. They’re talking about something called Exchange and Sharepoint “Online Deskless Worker” (targeted at people who only occasionally use a computer during the day) for $3 per month, whereas “information workers” are supposed to purchase the full suite, including Exchange, Sharepoint, Live Communicator, and Live Meeting for $15 per month.

I assume that there’s more difference between the two offerings other than just the addition of Communicator and Live Meeting, but there’s no way to tell that so far.

While the press release is enticing, the web sites that it links to make no mention of the new packages – looks like a case of right hands and left hands in Redmond not exactly meeting up on the marketing front. Compare that to Apple’s MobileMe announcements around WWDC, and you’ll see why people are so easily confused about what Microsoft is doing – even when they’re doing good stuff!

Live Search Maps now works with Safari and iPhone

Microsoft has updated its Live Search Maps to work on Safari and the iPhone. That’s very cool because it offers this cool angled bird’s eye view (a look at the side of Mary Gates Hall that my office is in):

Microsoft has updated its Live Search Maps to work on Safari and the iPhone. That’s very cool because it offers this cool angled bird’s eye view (a look at the side of Mary Gates Hall that my office is in):

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